Archive for December, 2009

Interaction is key for BPM and web 2.0

Posted in Business Process Consulting, Communicate / Collaborate, Practice Areas on December 11th, 2009 by Stephanie Chung – Be the first to comment

As a passionate practitioner of BPM and web 2.0, the question is whether both worlds can interact. It was good to see that a discussion has been started regarding “Will new social capabilities drive the next wave of BPM adoption or is social not a good fit for BPM?”

In my view, the social capabilities of web 2.0 are not the driver for BPM adoption. Rather, it is how they are implemented that makes them an enabler of BPM adoption. If we implement web 2.0 the right way, then it is a great fit for BPM!

I harp on about process understanding, not re-engineering, and a critical part of that is opening the doors of communication and honesty. For instance, what has been the impact to the people of a process change implemented? Via web 2.0 tools, you can easily gather the feedback on the fly. And how about the key concept of getting buy in from the people involved? Have the workshops and the face-to-face interviews to start with, and then enable further dialogue through blogs.

It comes down to our belief that it is not about the tool, it is about the behaviour. Business process at the end of the day is about finding out what someone’s behaviour is on a day to day basis in their work (what do they do and why do they do it). Successful Enterprise 2.0 is determining how to guide people’s behaviour to get the most out of the knowledge captured, and to nurture the collaborative nature of our interactions. So really it comes as no surprise that BPM and Web 2.0 can work as two peas in a pod!

Is change or transformation viewed as a ‘problem’ to be ‘solved’?

Posted in Communicate / Collaborate on December 7th, 2009 by Leanne Fry – 2 Comments

I subscribe to the Gurteen Knowledge-Letter, which never disappoints.  Issue 113 – November quoted from and linked to an online booklet from David Block .

 This quote caught my attention:

We cannot problem solve our way into fundamental change, or transformation.

David Gurteen raised it in context of the Knowledge Cafes he runs, where people often expect ‘tangible outcomes’ and don’t appear to see the value in conversation.

The quote relates to what the author identifies as a deeply held belief that the way we make a difference is by defining problems and then finding solutions.  The overall aim of the article is to define the toolsets communities can use to bring a vision into being. It’s about how to create that future for communities.

It rings true for the enterprise as well. So many aspects of corporate operation have a strong problem solving function and culture. But we can’t define change or transformation in the same terms we use to define a problem, and then recommend actions to solve it. If the underlying context hasn’t changed, then nothing much really changes.

‘Authentic transformation is about a shift in context and a shift in language and conversation.’ The author notes that to achieve a change in context, a rethinking of roles, accountability, partnering, and commitment is required. When you think about successful change programs, they have genuinely changed the context within which people operate, think, connect and converse.

My strongest experience of this is action was when I led a strategy program for a major organisation. It involved core services and touched every single aspect of the business. It required a new way of thinking and viewing the services. And it required revisiting roles, responsibilities and accountabilities. Some of those conversations were challenging. But we started shifting the context from the minute the project started, with the people who would play a key role in the future. We did this a number of ways, both formal and informal, and a key characteristic of both was conversation. We designed a new future that became much more than just diagrams and powerpoint presentations.

There are plenty of intangible benefits to be had from conversations within business, but they are rarely measured and often unacknowledged.  It’s easy to gloss over the conversations a team might have to clarify an issue, to come up with a new product or service, to offer a truly innovative approach to a business service. When business seeks to formalise activities so that everyone is clear about what is needed, it’s not surprising that project plans rarely contain activities under the following headings: conversation, syndication, socialisation. You might tell me they are part of a communication and engagement plan, but the primary approach of many communication and engagement plans remains broadcast.

So many of our day to day business tools are still firmly anchored in the desktop suite, which has as its primary purpose packaging information and interaction neatly up into clear buckets and clear pathways. So it’s not surprising that unstructured web 2.0 tools come with quite a barrier to adoption. When it can be hard to identify tangible, financial outcomes from say, an active internal blogging community, web 2.0 struggles at the hurdle.

But perhaps, in an organisation that wants to learn how to value conversation, they provide a very real opportunity to start shifting the context. The strength in a number of the enterprise 2.0 toolsets is in the fact that they sit outside traditional corporate hierarchies. It’s all about the content and the conversation.